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Citrus butterfly

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FACTSHEETS FOR FARMERS www.plantwise.org Created in Bangladesh , September 2013 Citrus Butterfly Recognize the problem The Citrus butterfly is a common and widespread swallowtail butterfly. It gets its common name from its host plants, which are usually citrus species such as the cultivated lime. Unlike most swallowtail butterflies, it does not have a prominent tail. The butterfly has also been referred to as the 'Butterfly of Death'. The caterpillar, known as the larva devours plants profusely, eating the leaves of the tender plants. A fully...

Published at: plantwise.org

Citrus withertip

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Published at: plantwise.org

Citrus gummosis

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FACTSHEETS FOR FARMERS www.plantwise.org Created in Nepal , September 2013 Citrus gummosis Recognize the problem An early symptom of gummosis is sap oozing from small cracks in the infected bark, giving the tree a bleeding appearance. Symptoms can be seen in fruit if the disease is severe. Decline may occur may occur over several years or can happen rapidly within a year, especially under conditions favourable for disease development. It may also be seen if there was high flower initiation. This will ultimately cause the affected plant to collapse...

Published at: plantwise.org

Bacterial leaf streak (Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzicola)

Published at: agritech.tnau.ac.in

pneucalyptustortoisebeetle

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PEST NOTES Publication 74104 University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources January 2009 EUCALYPTUS TORTOISE BEETLES Integrated Pest Management for Home Gardeners and Landscape Professionals Two species of eucalyptus leaf beetles from Australia, also called tortoise beetles (family Chrysomelidae), have been introduced into Califor- nia. Trachymela sloanei was found in 1998 in Riverside County and now occurs throughout most areas of California where eucalyptus trees grow. Chrysophtharta m-fuscum was discovered in Orange County in 2003 and has spread to at least four...

Published at: ipm.ucanr.edu

8267

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Olives: Safe Methods for Home Pickling Revised by SYLVIA YADA, Scientist, and LINDA J. HARRIS, Extension Specialist in Microbial Food Safety, Department of Food Science and Technology, UC Davis, working from the original publication by GEORGE YORK, Professor Emeritus, and REESE VAUGHN (deceased), Department of Food Science and Technology, UC Davis. WHAT ARE OLIVES? The olive tree, Olea europaea, valued for both its beauty and its fruit, has been a part of Mediterranean civilization since before recorded history. The olive was cultivated and its oil traded as early as 3000 B.C.E....

Published at: anrcatalog.ucanr.edu

IN37100

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EENY-214 Mediterranean Fruit Fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Insecta: Diptera: Tephritidae) 1 M. C. Thomas, J. B. Heppner, R. E. Woodruff, H. V. Weems, G. J. Steck, and T. R. Fasulo 2 1. This document is EENY-214 (originally published as DPI Entomology Circulars 4, 230 and 273, updated for this publication), one of a series of the Department of Entomology and Nematology Department, UF/IFAS Extension. Original publication date July 2001. Revised October 2007, June and September 2010, and October 2016. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu . This document is also...

Published at: edis.ifas.ufl.edu

Confirmation Juliana TPP CiLV C Mexico Dec2011

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Tropical Plant Pathology 36 (6) November - December 2011 400 Tropical Plant Pathology , vol. 36, 6, 400-403 (2011)Copyright by the Brazilian Phytopathological Society. Printed in Brazil www.sbfito.com.br SHORT COMMUNICATION / COMUNICAÇÃO Confirmation of the presence of the Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C) in Southern Mexico Isidro Izquierdo Castillo 1, Luis Felipe Zermeño Diaz 1, Walter Mendez 2, Gabriel Otero-Colina 3, Juliana Freitas-Astúa 4, Eliane Cristina Locali-Fabris 4, Gilberto José de Moraes 5, Renata Faier Calegario 5, Aline Daniele Tassi 5...

Published at: ainfo.cnptia.embrapa.br

npa02 02 daylily

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Figure 1. Daylily rust pustules and discoloration (inset)State of HawaiiNew Pest Advisory No. 02-02 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTUREMarch 2002 Daylily Rust Puccinia hemerocallidis Thuem. (Basidiomycetes, Uredinales) Eloise M. Killgore and Ronald A. Heu Introduction. Daylily foliage infected with a rust fungus (Figure 1) was found at a commercial nursery on the eastern side of Hawaii Island in February 2002, and was later found at Tantalus, Oahu, in early March 2002. The fungus was identified as the daylily rust, Puccinia hemerocallidis Thuem., by B. Bushe and D. Ogata of the College of...

Published at: hdoa.hawaii.gov

00001270

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Citrus Greening Roberts and Brlansky. December 2007. NPDN Publication No. 0025 Citrus Greening or Huanglongbing • Introduction • Distribution • Symptoms • Host • Vector • Management Introduction • Original observations of the disease were made by farmers in southern China in the late 1800s • Citrus greening was confirmed in Florida in 2005 • The Chinese name, Huanglongbing, meaning yellow shoot or yellow dragon refers to the leaf yellowing that may appear on a single shoot or branch Worldwide Distribution of Citrus Greening India China...

Published at: swfrec.ifas.ufl.edu

SCN Management

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SCN Soybean Cyst Nematode Management GUIDE FIFTH EDITION SCN remains the most important threat to soybean profitability in North America. Your soybean checkoff. Delivering results.Table of Contents 4 How important is SCN? 5 What is SCN? 6 How does SCN affect soybean? 7 Does SCN interact with other diseases? 9 What does SCN damage look like? 10 Soil sampling for SCN 12 Why are SCN numbers variable? 12 What are HG types? 13 Minimizing SCN impact on yield Your guide to managing SCN- infested fields for increased yield and an increased bottom line!...

Published at: ncsrp.com

68. Bushbabies are meat, too: Farmers in Malawi use indigenous plants to manage pests and livestock diseases

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Prof Steven R Belmain Agriculture, Health and Environment Department Natural Resources Institute Faculty of Engineering and Science University of Greenwich Using pesticidal plants in crop protection Factors affecting plant material usage Effectiveness Cost Availability Toxicity Ease of use Acceptability Versatility Cost was considered most important factor by farmers in Ghana low cost high cost Pesticidal plants usually do not kill insects quickly. Exposed insects may take a few days to die. PPs can be toxic but also act through repellency, anti-...

Published at: projects.nri.org

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Names

Citrus limon in differrent languages.

Citrus limonum
Citrus medica var. limon
Citrus limonum Risso
Citrus limonia Osbeck
Citrus medica var. limonium Brandis
Lemon
Standard lemon
Acid lemon
Meyer lemon
Bush lemon
Persian apple
Citron
Citronnier
Limonier
Limão
ᱞᱤᱢᱵᱩ
ლიმონი
Llimoner
Llimona
Sitruuna
Citrom
Suurlemoen
Harilik sidrunipuu
Citrónovník pravý
Нимбэг
ਨਿੰਬੂ
Կիտրոն
Limonu
कागती
Λεμόνι
Liin dhanaan
ရှောက်
Limun
Zitroun
เลมอน
Lemani
Sitroon
لیموترش
नेबो
Akaŋgaa
لیموں
Lumija
Limone
Lemon
Liomaid
ལེ་མོན།
Nìng-mùng
Limacuahuitl
Citronowc
نمبو
Tikrasis citrinmedis
Citronier
柠檬
Zitrone
Citrus limon
எலுமிச்சை
ᎴᎹᏂ
লেবু
લીંબુ
Citronnier
Лімон
לימענע
Limão
لیمۆ
Limau
Cytryna zwyczajna
لیمون
Sítróna
Le-bóng
Cėtrėna
לימון
ನಿಂಬೆ
ሎሚ
Citrono
レモン
Ndímo
Lămâi
Лиму
Limauni
Limon
Limonara
Citrus ×limon
Wamin ka ocawacicitc
नीबू
檸檬
Limoeiro
Sitrun
Лимон
Limoni
Jeruk lémon
Citrons
Citroen
Chanh tây
Cytryna
Suraval
Limoiondo
Líomóid
ليمون
레몬
Vé'ôhkêheóvemá'xeme
Nên-mûng
لامون
ގޮމަށި
ചെറുനാരകം
నిమ్మ
Citronowy bom
ಲಿಂಬು ಗಿಡ
Citrus × limon
जम्बीरम्
Lingoom
Puquy k'allku
لىمون

Q&A

Citrus limon
Description

A glabrous shrub or small tree with paired spines in the axils of the leaves, leaves trifoliate, the terminal leaflet largest (2-4 cm long), lateral leaflets much smaller than the terminal one (1-2-2 x 0.8-1.2 cm), broadly rounded at the tip, cuneate at the base, petiolules very short (1.5-2 cm), petioles short (3-5 mm) and wingless. Flowers fragrant, calyx 1.5-2 mm long, 3-lobed, green, persistent, petals 3, white 8-9 mm long, stamens 6, filaments slender, glabrous, 5-7 mm long, anthers oblong, 2 x 1 mm, nectary disk annular or short-cylindric, ovary 3-locular. Fruits ellipsoid to globose, 1-1.5 cm long, dull reddish-orange or crimson when fleshy ripe, peel lemon-scented with many small oil glands, 1-3 seeds per fruit, immersed in mucilaginous pulpy flesh (Stone, 1970, Liogier, 1988, Acevedo-Rodr’guez, 1996).


Source: cabi.org
Citrus limon Yellows
Description

S. canadensis is a 25-250 cm (mean 150 cm) tall, erect rhizomatous perennial with annual aboveground shoots and persistent belowground rhizomes. One to several rhizomes emerge near the base of the dying shoots in autumn, thus leading to a branched rhizome system rooted mainly at the old and current shoot bases. Each rhizome has the potential to produce a single aerial stem arising from the apex of the rhizome in the following spring. Roots arise from the shoot base and reach a minimum depth of 20 cm. Stems are branched only in the inflorescence, glabrous at the base, weakly to densely pubescent at least in the upper half and often reddish. Plants of var. scabra have nodding shoot tips during growth. Leaves are triple-nerved, pubescent beneath, lanceolate, often acuminate, with margins mostly serrate, occasionally entire. Inflorescences form broad pyramidal panicles with recurving branches and a central axis. Bracts of the involucre are linear, obtuse or somewhat acute. Ray florets are lemon yellow, female and fertile, disc florets bisexual and fertile. The corolla is 2.4-2.8 mm long. Achenes are pubescent, 0.9-1.2 mm long, with a pappus of 2.0-2.5 mm.

Biological Control
Biological control presents one method to manage S. canadensis, since it is known that biomass allocation and physiology of the plant in its native range are influenced by herbivores. In Europe, herbivore pressure is low. Snails and small rodents rarely feed on stems and leaves. In Switzerland, 18 phytophagous insects feeding on the S. canadensis are known (Weber, 2000).;The insect fauna of S. altissima (as S. canadensis var. scabra), S. fistulosa, S. gigantea and S. leavenworthii was surveyed in 1981-84 in and around Gainesville, Florida, USA (Fontes et al., 1994). The 122 phytophagous species collected are listed and classified according to relative frequency of occurrence, guild, host range, plant part attacked, life stages collected and associated Solidago species. Only 14 (11%) of the phytophagous species are known to be restricted to Solidago and Aster (Compositae) and there were eight insect species considered as possible biological control agents of Solidago spp. Eurosta sp. attacking roots, two leaf eaters (Ophralella sexvittata and Sparganothis distincta), two leaf miners (Agromyzidae sp. and Cremastobombycia solidaginis), a leaf galler (Asteromyia carbonifera) and Schizomyia racemicola and Schinia nundina attacking flowers and seeds.;S. canadensis is one of 14 selected species in a collaborative biocontrol project between USA and China (Ding et al., 2006).

Source: cabi.org