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Management of whitefly

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FACTSHEETS FOR FARMERS www.plantwise.org Created in Nepal , May 2014 Management of Whitefly Recognize the problem Whitefly adults are tiny (about 1 mm long) moth-like insects. They are white to slightly yellowish in colour and their bodies and both pairs of wings are covered with a powdery and waxy secretion. They suck cell sap from the lower surface of the leaves. The symptoms of whitefly infestation are yellowing of leaves, withered plant parts and reduced flowering and fruiting. Sticky substances appear on the leaf surface and sooty mold...

Published at: plantwise.org

Chickpea wilt

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FACTSHEETS FOR FARMERS www.plantwise.org Created in India , October 2013 Chickpea Wilt Recognize the problem Chickpea wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris is one of the major yield limiting factors in chickpea and is also known as “ Mar disease ” in Marathi. The disease causes 10–90% yield losses annually in chickpea. When the disease occurs at seedling stage, seedlings collapse and lie flat on the soil surface. In adult plants, the characteristic symptom is a brown to black discoloration of the xylem...

Published at: plantwise.org

Rice sheath blight

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Published at: plantwise.org

Cultural control of the Andean potato weevil

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Published at: plantwise.org

Sunn pest of wheat

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FACTSHEETS FOR FARMERS www.plantwise.org Created in Afghanistan , October 2012 Sunn Pest of Wheat Recognize the problem The Sunn pest is a dusty brown insect that is found all over Afghanistan especially on wheat, barley and oat crops. After hatching from an egg, it has five growth stages and four of them feed on wheat. Their eggs are green and are laid in groups. Adults have a typical triangular head. Background Sunn pests damage the entire crop yield. Wheat crops infested with Sunn pests are not suitable for consumption or making bread as they...

Published at: plantwise.org

Common pests and diseases of wheat

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Common pests and diseases of Wheat Plant Doctor Training Leaf Blotch FUNGUS –Septoria tritici Pow dery Mildew FUNGUS - Blumeria graminis  Rain splash spread  Look for black fungal fruiting bodies  White fluffy patches on leaves and stems  Become brown and the leaves die Take all FUNGUS -Gaeumannomyces graminis © Bayer CropScience. Brown Rust FUNGUS - Puccinia recondita .  Stunted plants that may produce white ears with no grain inside  Short black roots  Patchy and sometimes only areas of...

Published at: plantwise.org

Parthenium: Parthenium hysterophorus

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Par thenium is a vigorous species that colonises weak pastures with sparse ground cover. It will readily colonise disturbed, bare areas along roadsides and heavily stocked areas around yards and watering points. Par thenium can also colonise brigalow, gidgee and sof twood scrub soils. Its presence reduces the reliability of improved pasture establishment and reduces pasture production potential. Par thenium is also a health problem as contact with the plant or the pollen can cause serious allergic reactions such as dermatitis and hay fever. Par thenium is listed as a Weed of...

Published at: daf.qld.gov.au

Grasshopper monitoring and control in British Columbia

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Published at: www2.gov.bc.ca

Wintercereals north manual July13

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                Winter cereals* insect pest management   Northern grains region   *Winter  ce reals  include  wheat,  barley, oats,  canary  and  triticale.Compiled  by  Melina  Miles, July 2013    This publication has  been compiled  by Melina  Miles of Crop  and Food  Science,  Queensland  Department  of Agriculture, Fisheries  and  Forestry,  and draws  on previous publications and  original research  by DPI  Entomologists  over a number  of  decades.  DAFF and GRDC   funding  for the  IPM  Workshops  project (DAQ00179)  has assisted  the preparation  of this  public ation.   Front  ...

Published at: ipmguidelinesforgrains.com.au

Cover Cropping for Pollinators and Beneficial Insects

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8/17 DOUG AND ANNA CRABTREE’S VILICUS FARM RESTS on more than 2,000 acres in northern Montana, and it is a model of how cover crops can be a foundation of pollinator and beneficial insect management. Like many farmers, their approach to cover cropping began with an interest in soil health and quickly grew to encompass much broader goals as they recognized the additional benefits cover crops could provide. “We want to implement pollinator conservation at the field-level scale,” Doug says. “Anyone can create a small wildflower strip, but as we scale up, we need conservation...

Published at: sare.org

Cover Crops for Sustainable Crop Rotations

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06/15 CONTENTS This bulletin is a companion to SARE’s Cover Crop Topic Room, an online collection of select, mostly SARE-based resources on cover crops. Information is available at www.SARE.org/Cover-Crops on the following topics: Selection and ManageMent econoMicS eStabliShMent no-till Soil and Fertility ManageMent Water ManageMent PeSt ManageMent croP rotationS MiScellaneouS SARE’s Topic Rooms contain dozens of publications, videos and other educational materials on a wide range of topics, including local food systems, high tunnels, small ruminants and more. Visit...

Published at: sare.org

GrowNote Barley West 8 Nematodes

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SYMPTOMS AND DETECTION | VARIETAL RESISTANCE OR TOLERANCE | MANAGEMENT OF NEMATODES | TESTING FOR ROOT-LESION NEMATODES WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 8 NEMATODE MANAGEMENT BARLEY 1 NEMAtoDE MANAgEMENt seCtIon 8 BARLEY WESTERN JUNE 2017 Nematode management Root-lesion nemtodes (RLN; Pratylenchus spp.) are microscopic, worm-like animals that extract nutrients from plants, causing yield loss. 1 Root-lesion nematodes are found over 5.74 million hectares (or ~65%) of the cropping area of WA and populations potentially limit yield in at least 40% of these infested paddocks...

Published at: grdc.com.au

GrowNote Barley West 2 Pre planting

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VARIETAL PERFORMANCE | VARIETIES | PLANTING SEED QUALITY WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 2 PRE-PLANTING BARLEY1 PRE-PlANtINg seCtIon 2 BARLEY JUNE 2017 Pre-planting 2.1 Varietal performance 2.1.1 Selecting barley varieties As the number of barley varieties available to growers increases, the decision of which variety to use, come seeding time, has become more difficult. The Barley Variety Guide produced by the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia (DAFWA) and co-funded by Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) provides an independent appraisal of...

Published at: grdc.com.au

GrowNote Barley West 4 Physiology

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PLANT GROWTH STAGES | GERMINATION AND EMERGENCE | FACTORS AFFECTING GERMINATION AND EMERGENCE | EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE, PHOTOPERIOD AND CLIMATE ON PLANT GROWTH AND PHYSIOLOGY WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 4 PLANT GROWTH AND PHYSIOLOGY BARLEY1 PlANt gRoWtH AND PHYSIolog Y seCtIon 4 BARLEY JUNE 2017 Plant growth and physiology 4.1.1 Plant growth stages A growth-stage key provides farmers, advisers and researchers with a common reference for describing the crop’s development. 4.1.2 Zadoks Cereal growth Stage k ey Zadoks Cereal Growth Stage Key (Figure 1) is the most...

Published at: grdc.com.au

GrowNote Barley West 14 Environment

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FROST | SOIL MOISTURE ISSUES FOR BARLEY WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 14 ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES BARLEY1 ENVIRoNMENtAl ISSUES seCtIon 14 BARLEY JUNE 2017 Environmental issues 14.1 Frost Frost damage to cereals is a significant annual production constraint for the Australian grains industry and can result in considerable yield losses. It has been estimated to cost Australian growers around $360 million in direct and indirect yield losse\ s every year. The GRDC has long acknowledged the severe impacts of frost on crop production, and since 1999 has invested around $13.5 million in...

Published at: grdc.com.au

GrowNote Barley West 13 Storage

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HOW TO STORE BARLEY ON-FARM | STORAGE OPTION | AERATION DURING STORAGE | HYGIENE | GRAIN PROTECTANTS AND FUMIGANTS | MONITORING BARLEY WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 13 STORAGE BARLEY1 StoRAgE seCtIon 13 BARLEY JUNE 2017 Storage Successful on-farm storage depends on a range of factors. These include storage and handling equipment, capital costs and management used to maintain grain quality, and the control of insects and mould. Current deregulation of grain markets is now creating a need for more long-term on-farm storage of grain which will eventually enter...

Published at: grdc.com.au

Grownote Barley West 5 Nutrition

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ORGANIC MATTER | DECLINING SOIL FERTILITY | BALANCED NUTRITION | UNDERSTANDING SOIL PH | HIERARCHY OF CROP FERTILITY NEEDS | CROP REMOVAL RATES | SOIL TESTING | PLANT AND/OR TISSUE TESTING FOR NUTRITION LEVELS | IN-CROP NUTRITIONAL NEEDS | NITROGEN | PHOSPHORUS | POTASSIUM | SULFUR | MICRONUTRIENT DEFICIENCIES WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 5 NUTRITION AND FERTILISER BARLEY1 NUtRItIoN AND FERtIlISER seCtIon 5 BARLEY JUNE 2017 Nutrition and fertiliser With the more frequent use of opportunity cropping, improved farming techniques, and higher yielding...

Published at: grdc.com.au

GrowNote Barley West 3 Planting

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SEED TREATMENTS | TIME OF SOWING | TARGETED PLANT POPULATION | ROW SPACING | SOWING DEPTH | SOWING EQUIPMENT WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 3 PLANTING BARLEY1 PlANtINg seCtIon 3 BARLEY JUNE 2017 Planting Barley is very versatile in its planting time and can be planted relatively early in the season. Preferred planting times are from late April to June but this will vary for each region and variety depending on frosts and seasonal effects. Early planting in late April to early May will generally produce higher yields, larger grain size and lower protein levels, making...

Published at: grdc.com.au

GrowNote Canola West 3 Planting

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SEED TREATMENTS | TIME OF SOWING | RETAINED SEED | TARGETED PLANT POPULATION | ROW SPACING | SOWING DEPTH | SEED PLACEMENT | SOWING EQUIPMENT WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 3 PLANTING CANOLA SECTION 3 CAnolA - Planting 1Know more. Grow more. August 2015 FeedbackTable of Contents SECTION 3 Planting 3.1 Seed treatments 3.1.1 Insecticide treatments Imidacloprid products, such as Gaucho® 600 or Picus, are registered for use on canola seed, for seedling protection against low pressure redlegged earth mite, blue oat mite and aphids. These chemicals work...

Published at: grdc.com.au

GrowNote Canola West 11 Desiccation

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WESTERN SEPTEMBER 2018 SECTION 11 CROP DESICCATION/ SPRAY OUT CANOLASECTION 11 CAnolA - Crop desiccation/spray out 1 August 2015 Feedback Table of Contents SECTION 11 Crop desiccation/spray out (For information on swathing, see Section 12. Harvest.) Chemical desiccation is an alternative to swathing and very effective where crops have lodged or where weeds have emerged in maturing crops. The most commonly used desiccant is diquat (Reglone ®), which is registered for ground and aerial application on canola crops (refer to product label for application rates). Desiccation...

Published at: grdc.com.au

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Names

Hordeum vulgare in differrent languages.

Jau
Ngano
Hordeum distichum
Hordeum sativum
Hordeum vulgare var. distichum
See Notes
Barley
Cebada
Orge
Damai
Cevada
Gebs
Gerste
Gerste
Bere
Hordeum vulgare
Hordeum vulgare
Siwara
Adi arpa
Geaschtn
Jawawut
Heiz
Ordi
Hordeum vulgare
Haidd
Almindelig byg
Gerste
Barley
Ordinara hordeo
Hordeum vulgare
Oder
Garagar
Hordeum vulgare
Kesev
Ohra
Bere (slach)
Orge commune
Eorna
Cebada
Oarn
Hordeum vulgare
Jelai
Sebada
Hordeo
Bygg
Hordeum vulgare
Jawawut
Hordeum vulgare
Gaes
Hordeum vulgare
Pokok Barli
Uorgio
Gerst
Bygg
Bygg (korn)
Cevada
Siwara
Ordzu
Orz
Oriu
Baurley
Barley
Bhari
Heed
Elbi
Korn
Shayiri
Sebada
Arpa
Arpa
Ozr
Sebeda
Oidje
Mienhhaeux
Ordi
Orzo
Bygg
Hordeum vulgare
Hordeum vulgare
Gerste
Bere
Hordeum vulgare
Hordeum vulgare
Siwara
Adi arpa
Geaschtn
Ячмень звычайны
Ячмень звычайны
Ечемик
Jawawut
যব
ནས།
Heiz
Ječam
Ordi
Duâi-măk
Hordeum vulgare
Ječmen setý
Haidd
Almindelig byg
Gerste
Barley
Ordinara hordeo
Hordeum vulgare
Oder
Garagar
Hordeum vulgare
جو (گیاه)
Kesev
Ohra
Bere (slach)
Orge commune
Eorna
Cebada
Oarn
Thai-ma̍k
שעורה תרבותית
जौ
Ječam ozimac
Òj
Árpa (növényfaj)
Սովորական գարի
Hordeum vulgare
Jelai
Sebada
Hordeo
Bygg
Hordeum vulgare
オオムギ
Jawawut
Timẓin
Хьэ (къэкӀыгъэ)
ಬಾರ್ಲಿ
보리
Jääch
Hordeum vulgare
Òrzio
Gaes
Hordeum vulgare
Paprastasis miežis
Mieži
जौ
Јачмен
Pokok Barli
မုယော
Uorgio
जौ
Gerst
Bygg
Bygg (korn)
Òrdi
Сиск
Jęczmień zwyczajny
Cevada
Siwara
Ordzu
Orz
Нэчимиэн
Oriu
Baurley
Ječam
Barley
Jačmeň siaty
Ječmen
Bhari
Heed
Elbi
Јечам
Korn
Shayiri
ข้าวบาร์เลย์
Sebada
Arpa
Arpa
Órxo
Ozr
Đại mạch
Sebeda
Oidje
Mienhhaeux
Tōa-be̍h
Ordi
Orzo
Bygg
Hordeum vulgare
Hordeum vulgare
Gerste

Q&A

Hordeum vulgare
Description

P. pratensis is a herbaceous perennial grass species with shallow creeping rhizomes. It grows from 10 to 90 cm in height. The leaves have boat-shaped tips, narrowly linear, up to 20 cm long and 3-5 mm broad, smooth or slightly roughened, with a rounded to truncate ligule 1-2 mm long. The broad, blunt leaves spread at the base, forming close mats. The conical panicle is 5-20 cm long, with 3 to 5 branches in the basal whorls;the oval spikelets are 3-6 mm long with 2 to 5 florets, and are purplish-green or grey. Seeds tightly enclosed in the lemma and palea, 2mm long.

Hosts

P. pratensis has been reported to impact on, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare and Anemone patens.


Source: cabi.org
Hordeum vulgare
Description

Herb with stems decumbent to ascending, many-branched, 2-6 dm long, hirsute. Leaves ovate to narrowly ovate, 1-3.5(-6) cm long, 0.6-2.3(-3.5) cm wide, hirsute, more densely so along veins on lower surface, margins crenate, apex rounded, base truncate to subcordate, petioles 0-2(-3.5) cm long. Flowers usually 3-6 in verticillasters, these arranged in terminal, leafy, spike-like inflorescences, calyx usually tinged purple, campanulate, 5-6 mm long, hirsute, especially along nerves, cleft ca. 1/2 its length, the teeth slightly unequal, lanceolate, upper lobes ca. 2.7-2.8 mm long, lower lobe ca. 2.2-2.3 mm long, corolla pink, rose, or blue, 5-7 mm long, upper lip erect, median lobe of lower lip ovate, faintly spotted red near base. Nutlets black, shiny, muricate, obovoid, ca. 2 mm long. [Wagner et al., 2014]

Hosts

S. arvensis is an agricultural weed in Europe including Italy and Slovenia, where it invades carrot crops (Randall, 2012). In Wales, UK, S. arvensis was identified as an abundant arable weed that affects spring barley and grass crops (Hurford, 2007).


Source: cabi.org
Description

D. invadens is a small, agile, slug species with a reputation for pugnacity towards other slugs. Size range is 25-35 mm. The body is cylindrical, narrowing to a short but strongly truncate keel at the tail. The mantle is moderately large but less so proportionately than in D. laeve, so that the tail part of the body is clearly longer than the mantle. In living specimens the mantle is transversely wrinkled in front as in D. laeve. The body colour is variable. In Mediterranean countries a pinkish flesh-coloured ground colour is common with a translucent cuticle and few if any darker spots. This form can also occur in northern Europe. In north-west Europe two forms predominate, these are slightly or considerably darker colour forms. The most common is mid gray and translucent with lighter mantle, through the cuticle of which the shell and pale internal organs can be seen even in the field. There is a marbling of tiny darker spots, but these are difficult to see with the naked eye. In hilly or exposed areas a darker form occurs, with mid to dark grey ground colour and contrasting pale mantle on which darker spotting is particularly obvious. The respiratory pore is white-rimmed, more clearly marked in darkly pigmented specimens. The sole in most specimens is translucent grey and paler than upper body pigments. Pedal and body mucus is colourless. Internally D. invadens has a rounded, compact penis with two fairly symmetrical, slightly elongate and inturned, ‘side pockets’ comprising the penial caecum and penial lobe (see Reise et al., 2011).

Impact

D. invadens is a small, agile slug that is native to the Mediterranean and has been recorded from at least 46 countries worldwide. Until 2011, this species was known as D. panormitanum but molecular work revealed that it comprised two distinct species. This species is similar in appearance to D. laeve and as a result, the exact distribution and impact of this species is unknown. This is a particular problem in countries such as the USA and Australia and probably also in South America. D. invadens is regarded as a significant pest of agricultural crops in New Zealand (Barker, 1999) but is highly likely to be damaging in many other countries as well. References to slug damage in agricultural crops by D. laeve are very likely to refer to D. invadens. In addition to this, D. invadens is an aggressive slug which may compete with native slugs, decreasing biodiversity.

Hosts

D. invadens is a generalist slug and has been recorded causing agricultural damage to crops. Examples of these species include;Asparagus officinalis, Avena sativa, Brassica napus, B. oleracea, B. rapa, Cucurbita maxima, C. pepo, Daucus carota, Franaria vesca, Hordeum vulgare, Lactuca sativa, Solanum tuberosum, Triticum aestivum and T. durum.

Biological Control
Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita is a nematode parasite of slugs which, though most effective in controlling D. reticulatum and may also kill D. invadens (Speiser et al., 2001). However, this form of control is uneconomic for field crops at present.

Source: cabi.org
Description

The following description is from the Flora of China Editorial Committee (2016)

Impact

Erechtites hieraciifolius is a fast-growing, annual herb that is native to North, Central and South America and the Caribbean. It is recorded as an environmental and agricultural weed in areas both within and outside its native distribution. Mature plants can produce large amounts of wind-dispersed seed, facilitating the colonisation of new areas. It is adapted to grow in a wide range of disturbed anthropogenic habitats and can outcompete other species to form dense populations. It may also spread as a seed contaminant of crops. Currently, it is listed as invasive in Hong Kong, Hawaii, the Galapagos Islands, French Polynesia, Palau, US Minor Outlying Islands, New Zealand and Hungary. It is also considered a potential weed in Australia, where it is under quarantine.

Hosts

E. hieraciifolius has been listed as a weed of the following crops: oat (Avena sativa), barley (Hordeum vulgare), maize (Zea mays), strawberry (Fragaria ananassa), onion (Allium cepa), carrot (Daucus carota), cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon), blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) and sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum);it is also a weed of fodder crops (e.g. Medicago sativa) and of mixed pastures (Darbyshire et al., 2012).


Source: cabi.org