Mulberries (Morus alba)

Description

 

Resources

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pncarpenterbees

pncarpenterbees.jpg

Integrated Pest Management In and Around the Home C arpenter B ees Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program June 2014 P EST N OTES Publication 7417 Figure 1. Adult male valley carpenter bee. (R .S. Vet ter) Figure 2 . Adult female mountain carpenter bee. (J. K. Clark) Carpenter bees build nests in wood, creating galleries that can weaken structures; however, they rarely cause severe damage. People may be fright - ened by carpenter bees because of their large size, their similarity to bumble bees, and their annoying noise. IDENTIFICATION Most carpenter bees,...

Published at: ipm.ucanr.edu

66. Preserving wild food plants ensures a better future for all

Hibiscus_sabdariffa.jpg

Hibiscus sabdariffa Malvaceae L. Detail of flowers and leaves. (Morton J.) Harvested calyses. (Armstrong W.P.) LOCAL NAMES English (white sorrel,rozelle,roselle,red sorrel,jamaica); Malay (asam susur); Thai (kachieb priew) BOTANIC DESCRIPTION Hibiscus sabdariffa is an erect, mostly branched, annual shrub. Stem reddish in colour and up to 3.5 m tall, with a deep penetrating taproot. Leaves variously colored, dark green to red; leaves alternate, glabrous, long-petiolate, palmately divided into 3-7 lobes, with serrate margins. Flowers large, short-peduncled, red to yellow with dark...

Published at: worldagroforestry.org

Names

Morus alba in differrent languages.

Morus alba f. tatarica
Morus alba var. constantinopolitana
Morus alba var. multicaulis
Morus atropurpurea
Morus latifolia
Morus multicaulis
Morus tatarica
White mulberry
Mulberry
White mulberry
Chinese white mulberry
Fruitless mulberry
Downing mulberry
Silkworm mulberry
Weeping mulberry
Murier
Moreira
Amoreira branca
Witmoerbei
Morera blanca
Morus alba
Morus alba
Morus alba
Valkomulperi
Moreira branca
Bijela murva
Morus alba
Morus alba
Witte moerbei
Morus alba
Morus alba
Yuraq murira
Dud alb
Iboberi
Bijeli dud
Bela murva
Puting moras
Beyaz dut
Morus alba
Morus alba
Morus alba
Witmoerbei
آغ توت
Ağ tut
Шаўкоўніца белая
Morera blanca
Morus alba
Morušovník bílý
Hvid morbær
Weiße Maulbeere
ތޫތު
Morus alba
Morus alba
توت سفید
Valkomulperi
Mûrier blanc
Moreira branca
תות לבן
Bijela murva
Běła marušnja
Fehér eperfa
Թթենի սպիտակ
Morus alba
មន ស
Morus alba
Ciévësë gghiangh
Witte moerbei
Hvitmorbær
Morwa biała
Morus alba
چٹا توت
Morus alba
Yuraq murira
Dud alb
Шелковица белая
Iboberi
Bijeli dud
Bela murva
Vitt mullbär
Puting moras
Beyaz dut
Dâu tằm trắng
Morus alba
Morus alba
Morus alba
Witmoerbei

Q&A

Morus alba
Description

A small to medium tree growing up to 15 m, M. alba has a short trunk, and a rounded crown with a dense canopy of spreading branches. Leaves are alternate, simple, 6-18 cm long, 5-13 cm wide, broadly ovate, dentate or lobed with 3 prominent veins running from the rounded or obliquely cordate base. Somewhat polymorphic, leaves are shiny green on the adaxial surface, paler and slightly hairy underneath. Bark is light brown to grey, smooth but may be furrowed. Dioecious, male inflorescences are small with 4 stamens, filaments inflexed in bud, green and borne on long catkins. Female flowers are inconspicuous, perianth with 4 free or almost free segments, aggregated in short spikes. Fruit is an ovoid or cylindrical syncarp composed of achenes, pendunculate, red when immature, blackish-purple, purple or greenish-white when mature, 1-2.5 cm long (Global Invasive Species Database, 2016, Tutin, 1964).


Source: cabi.org
Morus alba
Description

M. nigra is a deciduous tree, 6-9 m in height, slender but with numerous branches;it tends to be a bush if not trained when young (Orwa et al., 2009). The tree has scaly bark and is usually kept pruned to a smaller, open, spreading shape. It can produce quite a dense and shady canopy. Leaves are rough on upper surfaces and pubescent underneath, 7-12.5 cm long, often producing leaves of several different shapes, with 1 or more lobes, multilobed leaves often appearing on the same branches as lobeless ones;abnormally shaped leaves usually produced from stem shoots or sucker growths, and frequently by very vigorous young branches. Flowers held on short, green, pendulous, nondescript catkins that appear in the axils of the current seasonÕs growth and on spurs on older wood. The flowers appear in 1.3 cm scaly clusters, female flowers ripening quickly into 1.3-2.5 cm blackberry-shaped edible fruits. Botanically, the fruit is not a berry but a collective fruit, an ovoid syncarp, made up of achenes each of which is covered by a succulent calyx;the fleshy bases of pollinated flowers begin to swell and ultimately become completely altered in texture and colour, becoming succulent, fat and full of juice. In appearance, each tiny swollen flower roughly resembles the individual drupe of a blackberry. The colour of the fruit does not identify the mulberry species which are better differentiated by their leaf and wood characteristics.


Source: cabi.org