Description:

Form: Pyramidal.

Characteristics:

Abies balsamea is an evergreen Tree growing to 15 m by 5 m at a slow rate.
It is hardy to zone 2 and is not frost tender. It is in leaf all year, in flower in May, and the seeds ripen from September to October. The species is monoecious and is pollinated by Wind.
Suitable for: light , medium and heavy soils and can grow in heavy clay soil. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic soils. It can grow in full shade semi-shade or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant is not wind tolerant.

Cultivation:

Landscape Uses:Christmas tree, Screen, Specimen. Prefers a good moist but not water-logged soil. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Very shade tolerant, especially when young, but growth is slower in dense shade. Intolerant of atmospheric pollution. Prefers slightly acid conditions down to a pH of about5, though the cultivar 'Hudsonia' is more tolerant of alkaline conditions. Prefers growing on a north-facing slope. A shallow-rooted plant, making it vulnerable to high winds. Balsam fir is estimated to tolerate an annual precipitation of 60 to 150cm, an annual temperature range of 5 to 12°C, and a pH of 4.5 to 7.5. The balsam fir is a fast-growing tree in its native environment, but it is fairly short-lived and slow growing in Britain, becoming ungainly after about 20 years. It grows best in the Perthshire valleys of Scotland. New growth takes place from late May to the end of July. Trees are very cold hardy but are often excited into premature growth in mild winters and this new growth is susceptible to damage by late frosts. Female strobili may be wholly or partially aborted up to 6 to 8 weeks after bud burst by late spring frosts. Pollen dispersal can be reduced by adverse weather. Trees should be planted into their permanent positions when they are quite small, between 30 and 90cm in height. Larger trees will check badly and hardly put on any growth for several years. This also badly affects root development and wind resistance. Trees have a thin bark and are therefore susceptible to forest fires. This species is closely related to A. fraseri. Plants are strongly outbreeding, self-fertilized seed usually grows poorly. They hybridize freely with other members of this genus. The cones break up on the tree and if seed is required it should be harvested before the cones break up in early autumn. Whilst the typical species is too large for most gardens, there are some named slow-growing dwarf forms that can be grown. Whilst these will not provide the resin, their leaves can be used medicinally. The leaves are strongly aromatic of balsam when crushed. The tree is sometimes grown and used as a 'Christmas tree'. Special Features:
North American native, There are no flowers or blooms.

Habitats:
Low swampy grounds where it is often the major component of forests. Also found on well-drained hillsides.
Woodland Garden Canopy
not Deep Shade
Woodland Garden Canopy
not Deep Shade

Major

Balzaminis kėnis
Palsamnulg
Pinus balsamea
شوح بلسمي
Abies balsamea
Irinacit
Ətirli ağ şam
Піхта бальзамічная
Balsam-Tanne
Ελάτη η βαλσαμική
Balzama abio
Baltsamo-izei
Palsamipihta
Sapin baumier
Balsamþinur
Balsemzilverspar
Balsamgran
Jodła balsamiczna
Пихта бальзамическая
Balzamovec